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Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb with Fingerling Potatoes, Leeks, and Mint Salsa Verde

Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb with Fingerling Potatoes, Leeks, and Mint Salsa Verde


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Lay the lamb flat on a cutting board fat-side up. If there is more than ⅛-inch of fat, trim the excess with a sharp knife. Turn the meat over and trim away any large chunks of fat from the interior, but leave the rest intact. Be careful not to trim away the connective tissue that holds the meat together. Sprinkle the lamb on both sides with 2 teaspoons of the salt.

Spread the reserved salsa verde paste over the interior of the meat (not the fat side) all the way to the edges, rubbing it into the crevices. Roll the lamb up lengthwise into a cylinder. Use kitchen twine to tie the cylinder at 1- to 1 ½-inch intervals to secure the roast and make it an even thickness throughout. Tie another piece of twine lengthwise to secure any flap pieces at either end. Allow the lamb to sit at room temperature for 1 to 2 hours before roasting to come to room temperature and infuse the flavor. (The lamb can be seasoned and tied up to 2 days ahead. If you plan to wait more than 2 hours before roasting, loosely cover and refrigerate the roast, but remove it to come to room temperature before cooking. Pat the outside of the roast dry using paper towels before roasting.)

Position an oven rack in the lower third of the oven (so that the roast will be positioned in the middle) and preheat to 325 degrees F.

Trim the dark green tops from the leeks. Halve the leeks lengthwise and rinse well. Pat them dry and cut into 2-inch pieces. Put the leeks and halved potatoes in a large roasting pan. Drizzle the vegetables with olive oil, season with the remaining ½ teaspoon salt, and toss to coat. Spread them around the roasting pan in an even layer. Place the lamb roast on top, seam-side down, and transfer to the oven. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of the meat reaches 135 degrees F for medium-rare, 1 to 1 ½ hours.

Transfer the lamb to a cutting board and allow the meat to rest for 20 to 30 minutes, loosely covered with foil. (The internal temperature will increase to 145 degrees F.) Remove the salsa verde from the refrigerator to come to room temperature. Toss the vegetables in the roasting pan to coat them in the pan drippings. If they are tender and nicely browned in spots, set them aside in a warm spot while the meat rests. If not, return them to the oven to finish cooking.

Trim away the kitchen twine and cut the roast into ½-inch thick slices. Arrange the slices over the vegetables and pour any juices from the cutting board over the meat. Stir the salsa verde to incorporate the oil, spoon it over the lamb to serve.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


Slow-Roasted Leg of Lamb with Mint and Lemon

Scott Phillips

Servings: four with leftovers (eight without).

For a weekend spring dinner that yields plenty of leftovers for the week, try a whole leg of lamb. The lamb is rubbed with mint, lemon, and garlic and then roasted until juicy and tender.

When buying, if you can, choose young lamb, which is tender, with a mild flavor. Look for firm, finely grained, pale- to dark-pink meat. The layer of fat should be smooth and white, and any cut bone should be porous, moist, and red. See the ingredient tip for more on what to ask your butcher when you buy this cut.

Watch our video on carving a leg of lamb into perfect, tender slices.


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