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Loaded Baked Potato Bread

Loaded Baked Potato Bread


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A yummy sandwich loaf that combines all the best flavors of a loaded baked potato -- sour cream, chives, potatoes and yes, bacon.MORE+LESS-

2 1/4

teaspoons active dry yeast

1

tablespoon butter, softened

2/3

cup Yukon Gold potatoes, boiled and mashed with the skin left on (I used about 1 1/4 Yukon Golds)

1/3

cup cooked and crumbled bacon

1/2

cup chopped green onions or chives

3 1/4

cups Gold Medal™ unbleached all-purpose flour

Hide Images

  • 1

    In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine water and yeast and whisk until yeast is dissolved. Let stand about 3 minutes or until yeast is foamy.

  • 2

    Add in butter, salt, sour cream and potatoes and mix with paddle attachment until combined. Add in bacon and green onions and mix until just combined.

  • 3

    Add in flour in thirds, mixing with the dough hook, on low, as you add in the flour. Mix until dough completely pulls away from the sides, then remove the dough and knead by hand about 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth and elastic.

  • 4

    Place dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

  • 5

    Remove risen dough from bowl and press down with fingers into a 6 x 8-inch rectangle. Roll up tightly from the short end and place the dough, seam-side down, in a lightly greased 8 x 4-inch loaf pan.

  • 6

    Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

  • 7

    Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375°F.

  • 8

    Once dough is risen, uncover and bake about 30 minutes, or until golden brown on top and a thermometer inserted in the center reads 190°F. The bread should also make a hollow sound when thwacked on the bottom.

  • 9

    Remove from oven and cool in loaf pan about 10 minutes, and then completely on a cooling rack before slicing or serving.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Homemade bread is a finicky thing.You have to be sure the yeast is alive, that the flour is properly weighed, and that you don’t knead the dough too little or too much. It has to be smooth and elastic, but not sticky nor crumbly. If you don’t let it rise long enough, the flavors won’t develop. And if you let it rise too much, well… I don’t know what, but I’ve heard it’s not good.That said, part of the reason I started baking bread in the first place was to learn about these idiosyncrasies — to find out, in short, what makes bread tick.One thing I have noticed in my experience is that potato bread is by far the best rising bread, ever. Each time I make it, it turns out perfectly. It’s always dense, but not too dense, starchy but not gummy, soft but not crumbly.To be honest, I still have no idea why potato bread rises so dang well — if you know, do share! All I know is that it’s one of my favorite types of breads to make. Not only because it’s easy and rises well, but because the dough itself is a dream to knead and the taste is out of this world.The local co-op was recently selling its own version of Loaded Baked Potato Bread, and after picking my jaw up off the floor upon hearing this news, I decided I’d go over there and buy about 100 loaves of it. Turns out, I was too late. Bummer.So I decided to make my own version, based on this Yukon Gold Potato Bread I made a while back. Like that bread, this version rose incredibly well and made for a perfect sandwich loaf. Plus, it really does taste like a loaded baked potato with chopped green onions, sour cream, butter and bacon.Though I chose not to include cheese, feel free to top your loaf with the stuff, and if you’re not a fan of bacon, leave it out. Either way, it’s a great loaf to make when you don’t want to deal with anything finicky!

To make the bread bowls, we followed the recipe for 5 Minute Artisan Bread. As long as you remember to do this early enough in the day, it will come out perfectly. I mixed up the dough first thing in the morning, and let it sit all day! Then at about 4:00, I divided the dough into grapefruit sized balls, let them rise a little longer, and then baked them.

While the dough was rising, I also peeled and chopped the potatoes for the potato soup. (full recipe below).

The children approved and there were NO leftovers!

Now, lest you think your family should be cutting potatoes out of your diet, think again! Potatoes have:

  • More potassium than a banana!
  • More vitamin C than a sweet potato
  • Fiber- to keep your kids regular.
  • Vitamin B6 for energy metabolism
  • 6% of the recommended amount of iron.

So, pick up some potatoes at the store today and make some soup!

To make the bread bowls, the recipe is below. we just make mini artisan loaves, and cut the top off, and dig out the inside!


Loaded baked potato bread

Lately, I’ve been a bit frustrated with baking bread. You see, homemade bread is a finicky thing. You have to be sure the yeast is alive, that the flour is properly weighed and that you don’t knead the dough too little, or too much.

It has to be smooth and elastic, but not sticky nor crumbly. If you don’t let it rise long enough, the flavors won’t develop and if you let it rise too much, well… I don’t know what, but I’ve heard it’s not good.

That said, part of the reason I started baking bread in the first place was to learn about these idiosyncracies — to find out, in short, what makes bread tick.

It’s been a bit of an uphill battle, learning the ins and outs of bread (side note: Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread and Rose Levy Berenbaum’s The Bread Bible will tell you almost everything you need to know about bread. Truth.), and I’m still only halfway there, maybe. But I’m not letting the challenges deter me. After all, in this year and a half of bread baking adventures, I’ve learned that no matter how difficult or frustrating the recipe, the result is always worth the struggle.

One thing I have noticed in my hands-on experience is that potato bread is by far the best rising bread, ever. Each time I make it, it turns out perfectly. It’s always dense, but not too dense, starchy but not gummy, soft but not crumbly. To be honest, I still have no idea why potato bread rises so dang well — if you know, do share. All I know is that it’s one of my favorite type of breads to make not only because it’s easy to make and rises well, but because the dough itself is a dream to knead and the taste is out of this world.

The local co-op was recently selling its own version of Loaded Baked Potato Bread, and after picking my jaw up off the floor upon hearing this news, I decided I’d go over there and buy about 100 loaves of it.

Turns out, I was too late. Bummer.

So, instead of wallowing in my self-pity, I decided to make my own version based on this Yukon Gold Potato Bread I made for Tablespoon a while back. Like that bread, this version rose incredibly well and made for a perfect sandwich loaf. Plus, it really does taste like a loaded baked potato with chopped green onions, sour cream, butter and bacon. Though I chose not to include cheese, feel free to top your loaf with the stuff, and if you’re not a fan of bacon, leave it out.

And if you’re a cat, please stay out of the photo shoot until it’s your turn. Good grief.

Loaded Baked Potato Bread
A Girl Versus Dough original

Yields: 1 sandwich loaf

Ingredients:
1/2 cup warm water
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast
1 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup sour cream
2/3 cup Yukon Gold or Russet potatoes, boiled and mashed with the skin left on (I used about 1 1/4 Yukon Golds)
1/3 cup cooked and crumbled bacon
1/2 cup chopped green onions or chives
3 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

Directions:
In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine water and yeast and whisk until yeast is dissolved. Let stand about 3 minutes or until yeast is foamy. Add in butter, salt, sour cream and potatoes and mix with paddle attachment until combined. Add in bacon and green onions and mix until just combined. Add in flour in thirds, mixing with the dough hook, on low, as you add in the flour. Mix until dough completely pulls away from the sides, then remove the dough and knead by hand about 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth and elastic.
Place dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
Remove risen dough from bowl and press down with fingers into a 6 x 8-inch rectangle. Roll up tightly from the short end and place the dough, seam-side down, in a lightly greased 8 x 4-inch loaf pan. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Once dough is risen, uncover and bake about 30 minutes, or until golden brown on top and a thermometer inserted in the center reads 190 degrees F. The bread should also make a hollow sound when thwacked on the bottom.
Remove from oven and cool in loaf pan about 10 minutes, and then completely on a cooling rack before slicing or serving.


Technically yes. You can use the microwave to “bake” your potato and then add toppings to your steaming potato. However, keep in mind you won’t get that same crispy exterior you would with the oven. If you’re making more than one at a time, it’s also probably easier to toss them all in the oven and walk away for the hour, rather than standing at the microwave. In a nutshell, stick with the oven method if you can help it!

  • Choose wisely. This is especially true when you’re serving a crowd, you want to pick nice-looking potatoes. Smooth, clean, and without any offshoots (those things that start to poke and grow out of potatoes – some people call them eyes).
  • Clean the skin. The skin can be eaten too, so make sure to scrub it clean.
  • Season the outside. Make sure to brush the potato with olive oil and sprinkle it with kosher salt. It gives the skin a great flavor.
  • Pierce the skin. Poking holes in your baked potato allows for the steam to escape and helps avoid exploding potatoes (yes, that’s a thing).
  • No foil needed. You may have seen potatoes wrapped in foil in order to bake them, whether in the oven, on the BBQ, or over a campfire. This method works if you’re baking a potato and trying to soften the skin. But to get the extra crispy skin sturdy enough to hold everything, you don’t need to wrap it in any foil.
  • Create an opening. Use your fork to break apart the potato before adding your toppings.


Do Potatoes Bake Faster in Foil?

I see a lot of people bake potatoes for their loaded baked potatoes in foil, but there’s no need! It all depends on preference for your baked potato recipe.

The crispy potato skin is my favorite, so I always wash my potatoes thoroughly and rub the outside with a little oil and salt. Baking them unwrapped helps the skin get crispy instead of steamed.

Since the aluminum foil also needs to be warmed, it technically slows the baking process slowly. Save the foil and skip the wrapping!

In a pinch, you can always soften a potato in the microwave before baking. This will help it cook a little faster, but note that the potatoes also cook very unevenly this way.


What you need to make these loaded baked potato bites

These potato bites are a breeze to put together! They take about 45 minutes total to make and require just a handful of ingredients. Here’s what you’ll need to grab from the store:

  • Russet potatoes, sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • A very generous sprinkling of salt and pepper
  • Shredded cheddar cheese
  • Sour cream
  • Crumbled cooked bacon
  • Chopped green onions


Reviews ( 26 )

Are you suppose to put baked in the mix? If so, how many? The recipe doesn't say.

A good solid dip, easy to make. Served with veggies and cheese crisps.

Used it to fill potato skins, HUGE success!

This is great as a baked potato topper also.

This recipe was good, but next time I will not use soo much bacon. Also, it must be served at room temperature because of the thickness.

Made this tonight for a house party tomorrow. Used some hot wings buffalo sauce and our preliminary taste tests are getting 5 stars. Before it even sits all night. We predict it will be a hit tomorrow. Oh and it's great on Ruffles )

My family and I really enjoy this dip. We've had it with waffle fries and also with potato chips. I have also made it with green onions and with chives. We like it either way. I have not tried ranch dip I think the dip tastes great as is.

Made this for a crowd and served it with little mini roasted potatoes. I added a cup of prepared buttermilk ranch dressing along with a half package of dry ranch dressing mix to add more flavor and thin it out a bit. Also doubled the bacon (isn't everything better with more bacon?) It was an incredibly popular appetizer!

RELISH. Terrific this stuff is addicting! I took the advice of daughter and added one envelope of ranch dressing mix. I also gave a pinch of black pepper to add some spice. You have to serve this dip with potato chips to get that whole "loaded baked potato" taste. I snipped some fresh chives on top for a bit of color. My family couldn't stop eating this at recipe. Try also visiting at www.gourmandia.com at www.gourmetrecipe.com, they have lots of tasty and delectable recipes for you to choose from. I assure you. you will not regret in visiting those sites.

I CHANGED THE SOUR CREAM TO WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE ( SO MUCH BETTER FLAVOR) AND LIKE OTHERS ADDED GREEN ONIONS. I ALSO PUT IN HORSERADISH INSTEAD OF HOTSAUCE - MY FAMILY WENT CRAZY FOR IT. IT ALSO TASTES EVEN BETTER IF YOU MAKE IT AHEAD OF TIME AND LET IT SIT IN THE FRIDGE OVERNIGHT ( OR 2) I WILL MAKE THIS ALL THE TIME. LOVED THE WAFFLE FRIES BUT ALSO WORKS GREAT WITH "SCOOPS" CORNCHIPS!

I made this recipe to order first, and then tasted it. I found that it needed more bacon and more hot sauce. I also added half a packet of ranch dip and used green onions over chives. Serving it tomorrow but suspect it will be a hit.

People love this. just don't add all of the hot sauce - it overpowers the flavor. I think I cut it in half last time

It was ok. It's missing something. The kiddo asked for seconds. Like others, don't see it as a dip but rather a topping. Next time I will slice some baking potatoes and make potato skins and top with this recipe.

This is a great recipe. It's easy and versatile, since you can adjust the hot sauce and onion to your taste. My family loves it. The waffle fries are delicious and decorative.

I just made this, and haven't brought it to the party yet, but it tasted good to me! If you don't think it has enough flavor ( I didn't when made according to recipe), add a whole 16 oz. of bacon, extra hot sauce, green onion (instead of chives), and black pepper. I can't wait to share it with my friends!

Cannot believe that this recipe does not have higher reviews. Of course, it is very basic but soo good!

We were disappointed with this recipe as a dip, but it made a great topping for our baked potatoes! I will probably make it again and try to spice it up.

I agree with another posted comment: It's just ok. Nothing special. There are plenty of other cheese dips or spreads that are better. Many to choose from on this site that are flavorful and impressive. I wouldn't even make this again if I were in a pinch for time and ingredients.

Where is the baked potato?

a quick easy dip that tastes good. Great for tailgate fare.

I recently made this dip. I thought it was just okay. I threw most of it away, because nobody was eating it. I would not make this again.


Baked Potato Bread

This weekend I found myself staring out the window at the abundant chives growing in my garden. What could I possibly do with them, I wondered, except eat them on baked potatoes? And how many baked potatoes can I eat before I never want to see another spud again?

Then it occurred to me that I've made potato bread before, so why not add chives to potato bread? And, heck, while I'm at it, why not throw in some other tater toppings like sour cream and bacon and have a full-on Baked Potato Bread?

By the time I had second thoughts about it, all of the ingredients were mixed together. But, you know what? It turned out excellent, the perfect accompaniment to a pot of corn chowder on a rainy day.

The full recipe is below.
Freestyle Baking

As I have written about time and time again, I think the real fun in baking comes once you have mastered the basics and understand how adding different ingredients in different proportions will change the character of your loaf.

Whether I am making up a recipe or checking out a new recipe in a cookbook, my point of reference is always the loaf I introduced in lesson 1, which is 3 cups flour, 1 + a little cups of water, 2 teaspoons yeast, 2 teaspoons salt. If I read a recipe and it has more water than, say, a cup and a quarter of water per three cups of flour I know it is going to a slack dough more fats (butter, milk): a softer loaf contains sugars: a sweet loaf and so on.

When thinking up this recipe, I took the lesson one recipe, substituted potatoes for about 20 percent of the flour, substituted sour cream for about 50% of the water, and added the chives and bacon and bacon fat. It sounded easy enough, though I made some adjustments as I started baking, as you'll see below.

I don't believe that I've every posted about a potato bread on this site, so a little introduction is in order.

Replacing between 10 and 30 percent of your flour with mashed potatoes results in a wonderful soft, moist loaf of bread. Potato flakes or potato starch can be used, as well, but leftover mashed potatoes work great even if they have some butter or milk or salt in them.

Do be careful, though: potatoes are considerably lower in gluten than wheat, so add too much potato and you will end with a dense, moist loaf, probably too much like a baked potato for anyone's liking. I find 1/2 cup potatoes to around 3 cups flour to be plenty.

In this recipe I used a couple of small red potatoes that we had steamed up as a side dish for dinner the night before. All I did was mash them up with a fork and mix them into the flour. I left the skins on before mashing them because I find the little red flakes speckling the loaf to be quite attractive.

Bacon isn't to everyone's liking, either for dietary or religious reasons. I see no reason why this recipe wouldn't be good even if you excluded it, but if it something you are able to indulge in I suggest you do. I definitely think it improved the flavor and consistency (and appearance, for that matter) of the loaf.

Enough blabbing. On to the recipe!

Makes 2 small (one pound) loaves or one large loaf

1/2 cup mashed potatoes
3 to 4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour (I'll explain the ambiguity below)
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup cooked bacon
1/2 cup chopped fresh chives

To begin, chop up two or three slices of bacon and fry them up. Remove them from the heat.

Mix the mashed potatoes, yeast, salt, and 2 cups of the flour together in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric mixer. If you have active dry yeast and want to substitute, read this. Add the sour cream, water, chives, and bacon and mix together until all ingredients are combined. I also mixed in the bacon fat, which there was about a tablespoon of in the pan, because it improves the flavor of the loaf.

At this point you'll have a very wet, sticky mess, probably more of a batter than a dough. Add additional flour a handful (1/8 cup) at a time and mix or knead it in.

(I lost track of exactly how much extra flour I added, but it seems like it was around 9 or 10 hands full. I added 4 or 5 hands full and mixed them in while the dough was still in the bowl, then I poured the dough out onto a well-floured cutting board and added more, kneading it with my hands which I repeatedly dipped in flour to keep the dough from sticking to them. After 5 or 10 minutes of this I ended up with something that was still quite sticky, but was definitely in the realm of a dough and not a batter: it could be formed into a ball and generally held its shape.)

Once you have combined the ingredients well and gotten the balance of flour and water to a level that seems acceptable, return the dough to a well-oiled bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise for 90 minutes at room temperature or until it has doubled in size.

Remove the dough from the bowl and shape the loaf or loaves. Notice how moist and gummy my dough was when I cut it to shape it into two loaves:

One probably could add more flour and make an acceptable loaf of bread with a drier dough, but I've been finding that I get better results the wetter I am able to leave it. But this really is an art, not a science, so use your own best judgement.

At this point you need to shape the loaves, cover them loosely and let them rise until they double in size again, about 45 minutes. You could put them in greased baking pans and let them rise and bake them in those. I wanted round loaves, so I put them in a couple of couche lined baskets:

Professional bakers use these kinds of baskets, which are very nice but completely out of my price range. I found two small baskets at Goodwill for 49 cents each and have found that they help keep the shape of my rounds very well.

As you can see in the picture above, I placed the baskets on a table, the couche over the baskets, and the dough in the floured couche in the baskets. I wrapped the edges of the couche around the balls of dough and let them rise. When they had risen I simply unwrapped the loaves and shook them out of the couche onto my peel (which I dust with semolina flour) and threw them into the oven.

While the loaves are rising again, preheat the oven to 425. If you have a baking stone, be sure to put it in early to heat.

When they have doubled in size (as I said before, about 45 minutes after shaping), put the loaves in the oven to bake. I baked them at 425 for 5 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 350 and baked them another half an hour. The loaves are done when the internal temperature reaches the 185 to 195 degree range (as read with an instant-read thermometer) or when they are nice and brown on the outside and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. For me this took about 35 minutes.

And there we have it. The bread was wonderful while still warm with a pot of soup, but I actually think I preferred it the next day cold. With the bacon fat and sour cream, there was plenty of fat in the bread so it didn't need to be buttered just plain it was rich and moist enough.


Save money with Homemade Pizza!

Of course, making loaded baked potato pizza at HOME is a much cheaper and even slightly healthier alternative. You aren’t going to turn this delicious pizza recipe into a low fat meal but you can certainly skip the preservatives and make it with all natural and fresh ingredients! That will alleviate a tad bit of the guilt, right? I mean, who can resist a pizza with ranch dressing, Cabot cheese and crumbled bacon? Not me!

More Homemade Pizza Recipes


Loaded Baked Potato Sheet Pan Dinner

One pan meals are all the rage right now, and my pinterest feed is full of dinners that can be made in just one skillet, pot, or sheet pan. As a busy mom of 2 busy boys, I totally get it. Who has time to dirty (and clean) a bunch of dishes and babysit a lot of stuff on the stove or in the oven? On most nights, not me.

And so I’m enthusiastically jumping on this bandwagon. Here’s to easy, no-fuss weeknight cooking!

This easy sheet pan supper has the components of loaded baked potatoes— potatoes, broccoli, bacon, and cheese— all roasted together on one pan. Topped with sour cream and chives, it’s a complete meal the whole family will love!


Watch the video: Πατάτες στο φούρνο γεμιστές με φέτα. Jacket Potatoes.


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